The Flies from:
The Treatyse of  Fysshynge
With an Angle
              Early 1800’s  England

These are the twelve flies with which you shall angle for the trout
and grayling; and dubthem like you will now hear me tell:

March
The dun fly the body of dun wool and the wings of the partridge. Another dun fly, the body of black wool; the wings of the blackest drake; and the jay under the wing and under the tail.

April
The stone fly, the body of black wool, and yellow under the wing and under the tail; and the wings, of the drake. In the beginning of May, a good fly, the body of reddened wool and lapped about with black silk; the wings, of the drake and the red capon's hackle.

May
The yellow fly, the body of yellow wool; the wings of red cock hackle and of the drake dyed yellow. The black leaper, the body of black wool and lapped about with the herl of the peacock's tail: and the wings of the red capon with a blue head.

June
The dun cut: the body of black wool, and a yellow stripe after either side; the wings of the buzzard, bound on with barked hemp. The maure fly, the body of dusky wool, the wings of the blackest male of the wild drake. The tandy fly at St. William's Day, the body of tandy wool; and the wings contrary either against the other, of the whitest breast feathers of the wild drake.

July
The wasp fly, the body of black wool and lapped about with yellow thread: the wings of the buzzard. The shell fly at St. Thomas' Day, the body of green wool and lapped about with the herl of the peacock's tail: wings of the buzzard.

August
The drake fly, the body of black wool and lapped about with black silk: wings of the breast feathers of the blackest drake, with a black head.
 

Web site developed by
Paw Boyce   and   Gary Kilpatrick